Buffalo crossing: Scenic Grandeur


buffalo crossing

I just posted this pic over on Facebook’s Western Historical Romance Book Club page. Thursday is photo sharing day for the group. Thought y’all might like to see it too. Just imagine thousands of the majestic beasts thundering across the river. That’s the way it was in the “Old Days” – before government sanctioned buffalo hunters slaughtered the animals by the millions to take away the plains Indians’ source of food, shelter, clothing and much more. All done to facilitate westward expansion by the railroads, gold seekers and pioneers seeking land for themselves.

777 Challenge: Excerpt from Dearest Druid


Thanks to Jacquie Rogers for tagging me for the 777 Challenge on Facebook, and for sharing her excerpt from Much Ado About Mavericks. This is the challenge:

Post 7 (+) lines from page 7 of my work in progress and then tag 7 other writers to do the same. open book. extra small

Here’s the excerpt from Dearest Druid, book 3 in my Texas Druids trilogy. Sorry, no cover available yet. This scene takes place after Choctaw Jack, an Indian cowboy, saves Rose Devlin from being injured by an enraged mustang. Jack sustains a minor wound and Rose tends it – without using her magical healing power. Now she’s worried about him.

Rose lay tossing and turning in her bed. The house was silent. No doubt everyone else had long since fallen asleep. Not her. Her mind kept dwelling on Jack, wondering if she’d been wrong not to use her healing power on his wound. Truly, it ought to heal well enough on its own if he didn’t get it dirty. If he did, infection might set in, leading to far worse trouble.

She could have saved herself the worry, and him a good deal of discomfort, by laying her hands on his torn flesh, but she hadn’t wanted to confirm his suspicion that she possessed some sort of magic. What if he went around telling everyone? She couldn’t chance that. They’d likely believe her a witch, as many had done when she was a girl in Chicago, and in the convent after . . . . No! She refused to relive the dreadful events leading to her expulsion by Mother Superior – and the horror that followed.

Now here are the 7 authors I’m tagging. Click each name to visit the author’s blogs. Come on, cowgirls, give us a taste of your next great book!

  1. Devon Matthews
  2. Suzie Grant
  3. Peggy Henderson
  4. Meg Mims
  5. Celia Yeary
  6. Ginger Simpson
  7. Paty Jager

WHR Book Club on Facebook


Cowboy kissing

Hey y’all, I have to tell you about an exciting group I recently joined on Facebook. It called the Western Historical Romance Book Club. If you’re a fan of western romance, you really need to check this out. You’ll find terrific authors and readers, plenty of book talk and some gorgeous scenic photos posted by our vacationing members. I hope you’ll stop by and give the group a look-see.

http://www.facebook.com/index.php?stype=lo&lh=Ac_znJkHU0mVVuJp#!/groups/WHRbookclub/?bookmark_t=group

Tagging, Liking & Yessing on Amazon


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As readers, we are all influential on sites like Amazon. More so than you might think.

Have you ever taken time to study the entire retail page for a book you’re thinking of buying on Amazon? Did you notice the Like button at the top of the page? This is a way to tell others you think the book is worth buying, or at least sampling with a free download.

Do you read book reviews? If so, do you occasionally answer the question: “Was this review helpful to you?” If you click the “Yes” button, you help nudge that review higher up the page. If you click “No”, well, you get the picture.

What about book tags? Do you know where to find them and what their purpose is? These powerful bad boys can be found down, way down, the retail page. Scroll past the Book Description, Customer Reviews and several other helpful areas. Finally, you’ll come to “Tags Customers Associate with This Product” .

Amazon advises: “Think of a tag as a keyword or category label. Tags can both help you find items on the Amazon site as well as provide an easy way for you to “remember” and classify items for later recall. You can add up to 15 tags per item.” Or you can simply click the little boxes by tags that have already been added. The more times a particular tag is clicked, the higher the book shows up in a customer search in that category.

With all of this in mind, if you have a minute, please visit my Dashing Druid page and click some tags (up to 15). While you’re there, if you feel like hitting the “Like” button, I ‘d be much obliged. Oh, and don’t forget the reviews. I just received a great one the other day from Big Al’s Books and Pals. Give it a “Yes” if you want to.

Invitation to Big Al’s Books & Pals


Howdy. I have a guest blog running on http://booksandpals.blogspot.com/ . The topic is “Druids, Yesterday & Today”. This is a compilation of a series I posted here about a year ago. However, it contains some new information as well as beautiful new graphics. I hope you will stop by and give it a read. If you feel like leaving a comment, I’d love to hear from you.

Wishing you a lovely day, wherever on Mother Earth you may be.

Lyn